Staff

Ben Gajewski

Executive Director
Ben Gajewski

ben@geneseevalleyconservancy.org

Ben is an active outdoor enthusiast, be it running, cycling, hiking, or camping. His passion for the great outdoors fits in perfectly with the work of the Conservancy and even allows Ben to take advantage of his passion for photography by share images of the important places the Conservancy protects.

Since 2007, Ben has assisted in all areas of the organization. Starting as an intern, Ben was hired as the organization’s first Stewardship Director, and in 2013 became the Executive Director.

A graduate of SUNY Geneseo with a bachelor’s degree in sociology and minor in environmental studies, Ben has remained a resident of Geneseo. He is an active member of the community and has served as Village Trustee, on the Association for the Preservation of Geneseo board, and on the Geneseo Farmers Market board.

Dave Bojanowski

Land Conservationist
Dave Bojanowski

daveb@geneseevalleyconservancy.org

Dave has resided in the town of Perry for 25 years where he and his wife have raised their 3 children on six acres overlooking the Genesee Valley.  His hobbies include woodworking, gardening and outdoor recreation.

For 13 years Dave served the Western New York agricultural community as a Certified Crop Advisor and as a Concentrated Animal Feed Operation (CAFO) planner for the dairy farmers. 

Starting in 2010, his responsibilities with GVC include implementing the agricultural Purchase of Development Rights program and assisting local towns and counties with farmland protection planning efforts.  Dave also focuses on public outreach and general education of the GVC farmland protection program and the importance and public benefit of a viable farm economy.

Jim Mott

Stewardship Coordinator
Jim Mott

jim@geneseevalleyconservancy.org

Growing up outside Concord, Massachusetts, in a farmhouse built before the Revolution, Jim spent most of his free time looking through natural history books and exploring surrounding woods, swamps, and fields. When his family moved to the Rochester area, he transferred his interests to the landscape of Western NY. Although this sounds like ideal preparation for his current stewardship work, his affinity for nature and open space initially led toward drawing and painting, and a career in fine art.

You can learn about his nationally-recognized Itinerant Artist Project at his website: www.jimmott.com. 

In his 30s Jim took some time at SUNY Brockport to pursue a degree in environmental science/water resources. He subsequently worked for 15 years as a freelance environmental consultant, with clients including the Nature Conservancy, the Western NY Land Conservancy, and Ducks Unlimited, before happily joining the Genesee Valley Conservancy in 2017.

Marcia Koch

Accountant
Marcia Koch

marcia@geneseevalleyconservancy.org

Marcia is the Purchasing Coordinator at American Rock Salt Company, LLC at their Hamptons Corner Mine location, after transferring from their Accounting Office in Retsof, NY.

Prior to joining the American Rock Salt team, she was the Vice-President of Operations at Perfect Form Manufacturing in Henrietta, an assembly facility for world-class brands of archery equipment. She has also worked for The ARC of Livingston-Wyoming, Campus Auxiliary Services (CAS) at SUNY Geneseo, and was the Accounting and IT Manager at Four Corners Abstract Corp in Rochester.

Kathy Barsz

Membership Coordinator
Kathy Barsz

kathy@geneseevalleyconservancy.org

Kathy has lived in the Valley since 1989 and works in Passport Health at the University of Rochester’s School of Nursing. “I commute on East River Road because of the serene nature of the scenery; tensions are mitigated by the visual beauty and the relaxed nature of the environment.”

Kathy personally benefits from the Conservancy by the opportunity to fox hunt and ride her horse in an environment that supports physical and mental health for both of them.

However, the importance of the Conservancy transcends Kathy’s own activities. She firmly believes that the natural space that is being protected will prove to support the community in ways that we cannot foresee but that will benefit our children and grandchildren.